The Wabash River has been integral part of life in New Harmony for hundreds of years. In 1815, the Harmonists, New Harmony’s first utopian society, built a dam on the river to power their grist mill. They also transported their goods to be sold…

At over 500 miles long and spanning the entire length of Indiana, the Wabash River is the largest river in the state. More than 65% of Hoosiers live within its watershed and the Wabash and its tributaries provide drinking water for 72% of counties in…

The Twelve Points story is an epic tale of courage and tragedy. It compels us into its journey through days of decline and ruin into triumphant rebirth. It’s the story of hope every small town or sinking neighborhood dreams of. Through a series of…

In 1915, Earl R. Dean of the Root Glass Company sketched out his idea for a Coca-Cola bottle design contest. His design was inspired by an image of a cocoa pod, which he found in a book at the Emeline Fairbanks Library. Dean managed to create a…

Originally the location of Terre Haute’s famous annual 4th of July mile race, the old four-corner track had been the ideal racing center for harness racing in this part of the Midwest. Surely one of the proudest moments in Terre Haute history was the…

Indiana State University was established in 1865 as Indiana State Normal School. As a “normal school,” its purpose was training elementary and high school teachers. Teaching methods reflected those used in a real-life classroom. Some of Terre Haute’s…

7th and Wabash in Terre Haute is known as the Crossroads of America because it is where two historically important roadways, U.S. Highway 41 and U.S. Highway 40, intersect. Highway 40 is the Old National Road, built in the 1800s to provide fast and…

At 503 miles long, the Wabash River originates in Ohio and flows westward through Indiana. It travels south along the Illinois border, eventually meeting the Ohio River. The river’s natural flow made it the easiest way to travel for early settlers.…

With its stately limestone and use of both Ionic and Corinthian columns, the County Courthouse is a superb example of neo-Baroque architecture. The Courthouse was designed by Samuel Hannaford, who was born in England in the spring of 1835, but…

Listed on the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP), the West 5th Avenue  Apartments Historic District is located west of Broadway and includes over 11 blocks of  approximately 40 brick apartment structures, most standing at least four stories…

Memorial Auditorium, located in Gary’s downtown, was built in 1927 and for 43 years, it served as the city’s only convention and social center, gymnasium, art gallery, music, and performing arts center. The Auditorium represents Gary’s building boom,…

The Gary Land Company’s First Subdivision covered the area from just south of the Steel Mill Entrance south to the Wabash tracks (9th Avenue), and from Tennessee Street west to Fillmore Street. In the First Subdivision, restrictions and controls…

US Steel needed laborers to build its steel mill and the city of Gary. A subsidiary of the steel mills, the Gary Land Company was tasked with constructing the town as well as housing for its workers. The Gary Land Company hired engineers such as A.P.…

Unlike other well-known centers of industry, such as Pittsburgh or Detroit, where the cities significantly predated the beginning of industrial development in those areas, Gary’s history as a city begins with US Steel. In the early twentieth century,…

Crothersville is a small town on the edge of Jackson County. Its name was originally Haysville but after being offered the opportunity to have a depot built if the town’s name was changed, it became Crothersville after the Jeffersonville Railroad…

The Reno Gang of Seymour, Indiana began with brothers John, Frank, William, and Simeon Reno. When Seymour founder Meedy Shields authored a legislative bill ensuring that all trains using the Ohio and Mississippi Railway should stop in Seymour for…

All that remains today of the Blish Milling Company are the towering 109-foot tall grain silos at Tipton Street and the north-south railroad tracks in Seymour, Indiana. Built in May of 1939 of steel-reinforced concrete, the silos which can hold…

The crowd began to gather early on April 1, 1969, waiting for a train bound west to Abilene, Kansas. It was cold and drizzly, but that didn’t prevent thousands of people from paying their final respects to World War II General and former President…

Asa M. Fitch was a multi-patented inventor. Among his inventions were a wheeled plow whose depth could be adjusted, a box, and a children’s educational card game which included various bird and animal species. In Seymour, Indiana, his major…

Railroad Bill, Railroad Bill Lived way up on Railroad Hill Ride, ride, ride Well, Railroad Bill, Oh, Railroad Bill He never worked and he never will Ride, ride, ride Well, Railroad Bill, he was a mighty mean man He shot the midnight lantern out of…

On June 8, 1921, a train engine jumped the tracks outside Medora, Indiana. Perhaps it was the hot weather and rain that made the train engine leave the tracks. Seventeen loaded boxcars piled up, some being “reduced to kindling wood.” Three people…

The Southern Indiana Railroad Freighthouse was not only a freight depot but also the site of an interesting story of one escaped enslaved man’s quest for freedom. Alexander McClure, an enslaved man from Tennessee, attempted to escape his bondage by…

The Farmers’ Club at 105 S. Chestnut Street, dedicated in 1914 in memory of Captain Meedy Shields, was constructed as a gathering and resting place for farm families coming to town for business and supplies. Traveling was slower in the early 1900s…