The courthouse square in Franklin, Indiana has been central to both commemoration and protest. For some residents, these monuments honor the many brave men and women whose lives have been cut short by the ravages of war. They testify to their…

Children’s book author and illustrator Norman Bridwell was born Feb. 15, 1928, to Vern Ray, a factory worker in this predominantly automotive town, and Leona Koontz Bridwell, a homemaker. He attended McKinley Elementary School (now McKinley…

When you arrive in Kokomo, you’re greeted by the friendly, familiar face of Clifford the Big Red Dog on a sign on U.S. 931 right next to the Welcome to Kokomo sign. It’s one of many ways Kokomo has honored one of its favorite sons, Norman…

Indiana University Kokomo is one of Indiana University’s regional campuses and is home to 32 Harris “Misch” Kohn’s works from 1932 to 2002, including “Bull Fight” (1949) and “Medea” (1950), both wood engravings on paper. After graduating from the…

Now known as Central Middle School , Kokomo High School was once attended by Harris “Misch” Kohn, who graduated in 1934. Kohn credited Kokomo as important to his development as an artist. His elementary and high school art teacher Bernice McKinley…

Temple B’Nai Israel, a small Reform Jewish Temple in Kokomo, owns and displays some of Harris “Misch” Kohn’s earliest work. Born Harris Kohn on March 26, 1916, he was a painter and printmaker. He believed that prints could be as beautiful and…

This is the headquarters of the Protestant denomination Church of God (Anderson, Indiana). It also houses the religious books publisher Warner Press. The Church of God (Anderson, Indiana) is an evangelical Protestant fellowship founded in Anderson,…

Founded in Chesterfield, Indiana in 1891, Camp Chesterfield has served as the headquarters of the Indiana Association of Spiritualists. It is a gathering place for worship, recreation, and relaxation. It consists of 44 acres along the White River…

Built in 1905 and financed by a $50,000 donation by the steel manufacturer and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie, a Beaux-Arts Neoclassical edifice served as the public library for the city of Anderson until 1987. In 1998, it was reopened as the…

In 1891, Charles Henry, a prominent attorney and politician from Anderson, acquired the “mule car” streetcar system in Anderson. In the six years following, he developed eleven miles of track inside the city on which twenty-one electric streetcars…

In 1851, the first railroad came to Anderson with depots at John Street and Madison Avenue and then at Jackson Street. It brought goods, people, and substantial growth to the community. Part of the Indianapolis and Bellfontaine Railroad, it was…

Originally known as Anderson Street, this neighborhood and its historic homes were built on the coattails of the Anderson gas boom and the prosperity it brought. The neighborhood includes Elmo A. Funk Park, named after the founder of the Coca-Cola…

John W. Lambert invented the first gasoline-powered automobile in 1891. His home on Hendricks Street, as well as the myriad of homes on historic West 8th Street, stand as the fruits of the labors of the owners of the numerous businesses (e.g.,…

The lives of local orphans were never all tragic. Happy memories and great achievements marked some of their lives, often because of the intervention of their extended families or the kindness of people in the community. From the beginnings of…

In May of 1927, at the height of the Prohibition Era, twenty-six year-old Mary Catherine Kamer wed thirty-eight year-old Joseph O’Neill in Jeffersonville. O’Neill had immigrated to Jeffersonville from Ireland where he became the business partner of…

Rather than run a local orphanage, Catholic churches in much of Southern Indiana sent children to large orphanages elsewhere. In America, Catholic, Protestant, and Jewish organizations vied to prevent people from leaving their flocks and to recruit…

Unfortunately, some Clark County orphans ended up serving time in the the Indiana State Reformatory South, among them Belle Moore’s brother William Frank “Polk” Moore. Belle was a fiery, original individual who captured the interest of reporters…

Belle Moore is an example of the incomplete, often contradictory evidence available about orphan’s lives. Born in 1867, Belle may have been surrendered sometime around 1875 by her biological mother, Sallie Crum Moore, a Jeffersonville native, due to…

At this rare, historic medical site, walking through the door takes you into April 1903. William Davies Hutchings, a Kentucky-born and trained doctor, moved to Madison in 1876. He practiced medicine at this location until his death in 1903. He…

After farm equipment and pianos, one of the other industries that has defined Richmond is the production of the lawn mower. Around the turn of the twentieth century, Richmond was unofficially known as the “Lawn Mower Capital of the World,” because…

Manufacturing was not the only type of business that took advantage of Richmond’s rail facilities. Wholesale houses sprang up in the vicinity of the Union Depot, and the largest ones even had their own rail spurs to offload material into their…

Richmond, Indiana became a railroad hub in the Pennsylvania Railroad system with major arteries leading toward Indianapolis, Fort Wayne, Chicago, Dayton, and Cincinnati. This meant that companies could use the railroads to easily ship goods produced…

Gaar, Scott & Co. 1836-1911 Most of the mills in Wayne County were powered by streams, but some took advantage of the many springs available locally. Gaar, Scott & Co. was Richmond’s first major manufacturer with a national reach. It began…

By the 1870s, more business flowed toward Richmond, Indiana. John Trayser, a piano maker from Ripley, Ohio, moved to the Whitewater Gorge and established the Trayser Piano Company. By 1884, local businessman James Starr and his brother Benjamin had…